Certified Lactation Educator™ (CLE®)


Introduction

CAPPA is an international certification organization for Doulas, Childbirth Educators and Lactation Educators. Since our foundation in 1998, we have certified thousands of perinatal professionals. As one of the first and most comprehensive perinatal organizations in the world, CAPPA is respected for its longevity and its commitment to excellence in both education and unsurpassed student and member support. Choosing an organization for your education is an important decision. CAPPA offers stability that you can be confident in as you invest in your education and career.

 

CLE® TRADEMARK INFORMATION


The United States Patent and Trademark Office awarded CAPPA ownership of the federally registered trademark of CLE® and Certified Lactation Educator™ in 2004. The CLE® Program provides candidates with complete evidenced-based training for offering private and public breastfeeding classes, advocacy, and support. This international program has been developed to provide the highest quality educators in the lactation field.


CAPPA prohibits the use of any of its registered symbols, insignia, or other identifying marks without express written approval. Unauthorized use of the marks is trademark infringement and is strictly prohibited by law.


SCOPES OF PRACTICE


Lactation Educator Community Lactation Educator


The CAPPA Certified Lactation Educator™, CLE®


CAPPA Lactation Educators fill an important role in educating, counseling, and supporting families and the community by providing evidence based information about lactation and breastfeeding.


How CAPPA Lactation Educators work with families


Lactation Educators work with families from preconception through the stage of weaning offering education, encouragement, counseling, an experienced point of view, and fostering confidence, and a commitment to breastfeeding. Lactation Educators can be found working in a variety of settings to offer their services to families. Families can find them working as public health educators, WIC peer counselors, hospital/community educators, pediatric support professionals, and in private practice as educators.


How CAPPA Lactation Educators work within the healthcare system


Lactation educators are educators and counselors, not clinicians. Therefore Lactation Educators work within the healthcare system by offering appropriate referrals when their observance or counseling uncovers situations that require health care attention or support.


Clinical Limitations of CAPPA Lactation Educators


CAPPA does not issue Certified Lactation Consultant status, nor does the Lactation Educator course qualify one to dispense medical advice, diagnose, or prescribe medication. Lactation Educators do not offer information that directs families to act against medical advice.


CAPPA Standards


CAPPA Lactation Educators work within CAPPA’s standards of practice to uphold the following (available to read as individual documents): code of conduct, a grievance policy, mission statement, vision statement, organization philosophy, and social media policy. CAPPA Lactation educators use current evidence based information in their practice. They maintain their knowledge and skills through continuing education. They work within the legal framework of their individual community and region.


CAPPA Certified Lactation Educators™:



  • Offer non-biased focused information, support, encouragement, guidance, referrals, and education to their communities, which includes families and professionals

  • Provide culturally sensitive and adult based education

  • Refer to healthcare professionals when support requires clinical assessment, need for prescription, or medical diagnosis

  • Help families understand their rights according to current healthcare policy and legal statues

  • Advise parents on how to maintain lactation when they are separated from their infant, which includes information on hand expression and the usage of breast pumps

  • Offer continual support for families during the weaning process and beyond as it pertains to breastfeeding

  • Educate, support and offer referrals to mothers who need to supplement or find that breastfeeding must be halted due to medical and/or personal reasons


The CAPPA Lactation Educator is not a clinician and therefore does not:



  • Take a medical history or take medical notes on their clients.

  • Provide clinical written histories to healthcare workers (as they do not take clinical notes)

  • Give clinical assessment of the mother’s breasts, the baby’s mouth, or the dyad’s dysfunctional latch

  • Use pre and post lacteal weight checks for assessment

  • Prescribe the use of medical devices including but not limited to nipple shields, supplemental nursing systems, and topical ointments


The CAPPA Community Lactation Educator, LE(C)


CAPPA Community Lactation Educators fill an important function in educating and supporting families interested in learning about feeding and parenting methods. This education may take place in the public, hospital, clinical or private setting. Community Lactation Educators provide informational, emotional and practical support of breastfeeding. They may provide this service exclusively as Lactation Educators, or may use their training to augment their support in other professions, in the cases of doulas, childbirth educators, nurses, dieticians, and postnatal or parenting educators. In addition to providing breastfeeding information, Lactation Educators offer encouragement, companionship, an experienced point of view, and foster confidence and a commitment to breastfeeding. Breastfeeding education is not restricted to new families, but applies to the general public and medical staff as well. Due to the limited breastfeeding information given in standard medical and nursing training, and the rampant misinformation about breastfeeding that is so prevalent today, the CAPPA Certified Community Lactation Educator serves as a resource for accurate, evidence-based information to the public and health care providers, as well as to childbearing families.


This program is distinct and separate form the CLE® program. While both the LE(C) and the CLE® provide families with support and education, the LE(C) is not qualified to lead group classes or facilitate a breastfeeding class. They are trained breastfeeding professionals that offer one on one breastfeeding support and education. The LE(C) also does not offer medical advice or provide lactation consulting or breastfeeding assessment. The LE(C) does receive extensive training in proper referral for families needing breastfeeding intervention. This program does not issue Lactation Consultant status, and does not qualify one to issue medical advice, diagnose medical conditions for mother or baby, or to prescribe treatment or medication. Currently. CAPPA LE(C)s can work in many fields providing support and advocacy for families across the United States and internationally. CAPPA LE(C)s can be found as WIC peer counselors, as educators on hospital postpartum floors, working as breast pump rental technicians and in breastfeeding support stores, and working in public health departments – just to name a few. Many of our CAPPA LE(C)s also use this certification to round out their labor and postpartum doula services and knowledge to ensure they are providing the highest quality services for breastfeeding support.


POSITION PAPER


The Lactation Educator’s Role in Providing Breastfeeding Information and Support


Introduction

Extensive research has proved the numerous benefits of breastfeeding for infants, mothers, and society. These benefits are well-documented and increase with each subsequent research study that is published. Breastfeeding’s contribution to infant and maternal health is so significant that policies have been set by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the World Health Organization, the National Medical Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the American Public Health Association, among others, to actively promote and protect breastfeeding. Cooperatives between governmental agencies and professional and voluntary organizations have been formed, such as the U.S. Office of Women’s Health Subcommittee on Breastfeeding, Healthy People 2000 and Healthy 2010 to help implement these policies. However, in practice, breastfeeding is often neither protected nor promoted in our society. As a result, breastfeeding rates fall far short of the goals cited in these policies. The steps which have been designated as critical to changing this scenario largely focus on two necessary components: education and support.


The Importance of Breastfeeding


The current U. S. Surgeon General, David Satcher, has stated that “Breastfeeding is one of the most important contributors to infant health. Breastfeeding provides a range of benefits for the infant’s growth, immunity and development. In addition, breastfeeding improves maternal health and contributes economic benefits to the family, health care system, and workplace.” Many medical and scientific journals have reiterated these facts and referred to the necessity of widespread support for breastfeeding. This includes The American Journal of Tropic Medicine and Hygiene, which stated that recent breastfeeding research data “…has brought to the forefront of the public, professional and political attention the significance of breastfeeding and the need for appropriate programs to promote this fundamental biological activity.”


Breastfeeding is now seen as preventative medicine, lowering the incidence and severity of the following childhood and adult conditions: appendicitis, asthma, breast cancer, childhood cancers, Crohn’s disease, colitis, diabetes, ear infections, eczema, gastroenteritis, gastroesophageal reflux, inguinal hernia, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, leukemia, multiple sclerosis, orthodontic problems, osteoporosis, respiratory illnesses, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, urinary tract infections, vision problems and whooping cough. Other studies show breastfed infants have less incidence and severity of otitis media, invasive bacterial infections and celiac disease, and later in life showed less obesity and higher IQ scores. Mothers who breastfeed experience less hemorrhage, longer intervals between pregnancies, and may lower their risk of ovarian cancer. Increasing breastfeeding rates could lead to significant improvements in future public health.


Working to Improve Breastfeeding Rates


Due to the tremendous benefits above, influential organizations have made efforts to emphasize to the public the great importance of initiation and longer duration of breastfeeding. The American Academy of Pediatrics updated its policy to recommend breastfeeding be maintained exclusively (without supplementation) for 6 months, continued for at least a year, and thereafter as long as mutually desirable for mother and baby. Healthy People 2000 set a goal of 75% of women breastfeeding immediately postpartum and 50% at 6 months postpartum. Unfortunately, these goals have not been met. Healthy People 2010 continues these goals with two additional objectives: that 25% of mothers will breastfeed their babies at one year and that the disparities between African-American and Caucasian breastfeeding rates will be diminished.

In 1998 (the most recent year for which data is currently available), 64% of Caucasian women breastfeed after birth, compared with 45% of African American women. At 6 months, 31% of Caucasian women were breastfeeding, but only 19% of African-American women continued to breastfed. At one year, 17% of Caucasian women breastfed, but just 9% of African-American women did so. Clearly, increased efforts must be made to promote breastfeeding in general, and to target the needs of the African American community.


In 2000, U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher, with the help of the Office on Women’s Health, developed the HHS Blueprint for Action on Breastfeeding. This document, along with the World Health Organization’s Evidence for the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding and the UNICEF/ Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative have all emphasized 2 factors in increasing breastfeeding rates: education (of the medical staff, public and the childbearing family) and providing supportive conditions (emotional support, guidance and avoidance of practices which hinder breastfeeding).


These recommendations echo those in the Report of the Surgeon General’s Workshop on Breastfeeding and Human Lactation in 1984. Lactation Educators can assist in reaching all these goals which include: strengthening the support of breastfeeding (including within the health care system), improving professional education in breastfeeding, initiating a national promotional effort to support working women who want to breastfeed, and developing public education, promotional efforts and a range of community support services.


 The Role of the Lactation Educator


Lactation Educators fill an important function in educating and supporting families interested in learning about breastfeeding. This education may take place in the public, hospital, clinical or private setting. Since many CAPPA-Certified Lactation Educators are willing to come to the family’s home, this assures that families without easy access to lactation consultant offices or La Leche League meetings will not fall through the cracks. They may have common breastfeeding questions and concerns addressed in the comfort and privacy of their home, and referrals will be made, if needed. As our society becomes more “breastfeeding-friendly” the number of Lactation Educators, lactation consultants and La Leche League groups should grow, making all of these valuable resources available to the childbearing community.


Breastfeeding education is not restricted to new families, but applies to medical staff as well. The American Academy of Pediatrics Policy Statement on “Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk” refers to research which indicates that “ obstacles to the initiation and continuation of breastfeeding include physician apathy and misinformation.” Due to the limited breastfeeding information provided in standard medical training, and the rampant misinformation about breastfeeding that is so prevalent in our society, the breastfeeding educator serves as a resource for accurate, evidence-based information to the public and health care providers, as well as to childbearing families.


CAPPA does not issue Certified Lactation Consultant status, nor does the Lactation Educator Program qualify a member to provide medical advice, diagnose or prescribe medication. However, Lactation Educators provide a wealth of information about how and why to breastfeed; establishing a breastfeeding-friendly environment; basic breastfeeding anatomy and physiology; the normal process of lactation; deviations from normal; physical, emotional and sociological barriers to breastfeeding; overcoming challenges; and resources available (including medical referrals) for the breastfeeding family. They can also be a source of vital support, guidance and encouragement throughout the duration of breastfeeding.


Lactation Educators assist parents in meeting all of the “5 C’s” that Dr. Sears includes in his Keys to Successful Breastfeeding in The Breastfeeding Book: “a class, camaraderie, consultants, confidence and commitment.” It is CAPPA’s goal to provide the community with access to this critical education and support. In doing so, Lactation Educators play a vital part in increasing breastfeeding rates and helping families who choose to breastfeed.


CAPPA Philosophy of Lactation Education


Breastfeeding is undeniably best and should be strongly encouraged. All families should have the opportunity to become educated as to why breastfeeding is best for both mother and baby. They should also be encouraged to attend a breastfeeding class and support group while they are still pregnant so that they may make an informed decision about infant feeding. Many parents, when they become educated, will want to breastfeed, but it is important to recognize that there are many reasons why some cannot or choose not to do so. It is not the place of the Lactation Educator to create guilt surrounding infant feeding, but rather to educate parents so that they may make truly informed decisions. Health care providers who work with childbearing families have great influence over whether or not a parent chooses to breastfeed or continue breastfeeding. It is critical that all medical staff working with these families have access to updated, evidence-based information on the mechanics and benefits of breastfeeding and how to provide an environment that supports this choice. CAPPA supplies the highest quality of training, to ensure that Certified Lactation Educators meet the diverse informational needs of the public.


Conclusion


The promotion and protection of breastfeeding is clearly a priority in improving public health. As breastfeeding rates continue to be low, the longtime barriers to breastfeeding remain: a general lack of education and support of breastfeeding. Lactation Educators play a critical role in providing these services. Studies show that encouragement, counseling, peer support and guidance are important factors which increase initiation and duration of breastfeeding. Lactation Educators can assist parents with their vital needs and assure that families, health care providers and the public receive the accurate, evidence-based information necessary to promote a breastfeeding-friendly culture.


References



  • American Academy of Pediatrics. Policy Statement: Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk (RE9729) Pediatrics 1997;100 (6):1035-1039.

  • American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Breastfeeding: Maternal and Infant Aspects. ACOG Educational Bulletin No. 258. Washington DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, July 2000.

  • American Public Health Association. Breastfeeding. APHA Public Policy Statements No. 7403 (1974) and No. 8226 (1982). Washington DC: American Public Health Association.

  • Giugliani, ERJ, Caiaffa WT, Vogelhut J, Witter FR, Perman JA. Effect of Breastfeeding Support from Different Sources on Mothers’ Decisions to Breastfeed. Journal of Human Lactation, 1994;10(3):157-161.

  • Grummer-Strawn LM, Rice SP, Dugas K, Clark LD, BentonDavis, S. An Evaluation of Breastfeeding Promotion through Peer Counseling in Mississippi WIC Clinics. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 1997; (1) 1:35-42.

  • Huggins, Kathleen and Ziedrich, Linda. The Nursing Mother’s Guide to Weaning. Boston: The Harvard Common Press, 1994.

  • Institute of Medicine. Nutrition During Lactation. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1991.

  • Mohrbacher, Nancy and Stock, Julie. The Breastfeeding Answer Book. Franklin Park, IL: La Leche League International, 1991.

  • National Medical Association. Pediatrics Section of the National Medical Association Statement on Breastfeeding: Promotion, Protection and Support of Breastfeeding. Washington DC: National Medical Association, May 2000.

  • Sears, Martha and Sears, Dr. William. The Breastfeeding Book. Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 2000.

  • UNICEF/WHO. The UNICEF/Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative: Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. New York: UNICEF, 1992.

  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives. Washington DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, January 1990, DHHS pub. No. 91-50212.

  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Healthy People 2010: National Health Conference Edition, Volumes I and II. Washington DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, January 2000.

  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. HHS Blueprint for Action on Breastfeeding. Washington DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office on Women’s Health, 2000.

  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Report of the Surgeon General’s Workshop on Breastfeeding and Human Lactation. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Health resources and Services Administration, 1985. DHHS pub. No. HRS-D-MC 84-2.

  • World Health Organization. Evidence for the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. Geneva: WHO, 1998.


This Position Paper was written by the CAPPA Director of Lactation Education Programs, Wendy Middleton, BA, CLE, CPD, ICPE, CD (DONA) and approved by CAPPA. Copyright remains with CAPPA, PO Box 491448, Lawrenceville, GA 30043. 1-888-548-3672.


Copyright CAPPA 2002. CAPPA hereby grants permission for reprint with complete attribution.


TRADITIONAL (IN-PERSON) COURSE


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TRADITIONAL (IN-PERSON) COURSE


This course is designed for students who choose to take the in-person training class.



Course Requirements



  • 2 years to complete your course from the date of your CAPPA in-person training class.

  • CAPPA certification candidates must be at least 18 years of age. No person under 18 years of age may attend CAPPA training classes.

  • Be a member of CAPPA.

  • Enroll in the Lactation Educator Traditional Course in CAPPA Academy.

  • Attend a 20-hour CAPPA Lactation Educator training class.

  • Read the CAPPA Lactation Educator training manual and the required books from the CAPPA required reading list.

  • Document attendance of two La Leche League, Nursing Mother’s Council or local breastfeeding support meetings.

  • Attend a breastfeeding consultation as an observer/volunteer with an IBCLC or CLC for a minimum of 4 hours. Details/forms are provided within CAPPA Academy.

  • Order, read, and complete all online content, including videos, from the Understanding Breastfeeding Book, available in the CAPPA shop. Details/forms are provided within CAPPA Academy.

  • Review three current research studies. Details/forms are provided within CAPPA Academy.

  • Create a resource list with information on local support for parents. A guide for creating this list is included within CAPPA Academy.

  • Submit a one-hour video of yourself teaching. Details/forms are provided within CAPPA Academy.

  • Submit two letters of recommendation.

  • In order for candidates to be eligible for CAPPA certification they must sign and agree to the following forms: Code of Conduct and Social Media Policy, Grievance Policy, Mission Statement, CAPPA Approach / Philosophy Statement, Vision Statement, and Scope of Practice.

  • Pass the multiple choice exam and essays in CAPPA Academy. An 85% passing grade is required.

  • Please view all of CAPPA’s Policies and Procedures.


ONLINE DISTANCE LEARNING COURSE



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ONLINE DISTANCE LEARNING COURSE


This course is designed for students who are unable to take the in-person training class.



Course Requirements



  • 2 years to complete your course once you enroll.

  • CAPPA certification candidates must be at least 18 years of age.

  • Be a member of CAPPA.

  • Enroll in the Online Distance Learning Course.

  • Read the CAPPA Lactation Educator training manual and the required books from the CAPPA required reading list.

  • Document attendance of two La Leche League, Nursing Mother’s Council or local breastfeeding support meetings.

  • Submit class outline and curriculum, including all handouts.

  • Submit two letters of recommendation.

  • Attend a breastfeeding consultation as an observer/volunteer with an IBCLC or CLC for a minimum of 4 hours. Details/forms are provided within CAPPA Academy.

  • Order, read, and complete all online content, including videos, from the Understanding Breastfeeding Book, available in the CAPPA shop. Details/forms are provided within CAPPA Academy.

  • Review two current research studies. Details/forms are provided within CAPPA Academy.

  • Create a resource list with information on local support for parents. A guide for creating this list is included within CAPPA Academy.

  • Submit a one-hour video of yourself teaching. Details/forms are provided within CAPPA Academy.

  • In order for candidates to be eligible for CAPPA certification they must sign and agree to the following forms: Code of Conduct and Social Media Policy, Grievance Policy, Mission Statement, CAPPA Approach / Philosophy Statement, Vision Statement, and Scope of Practice.

  • Pass the multiple choice exam and essays in CAPPA Academy. An 85% passing grade is required.

  • Please view all of CAPPA’s Policies and Procedures.


ACCELERATED COURSE


ACCELERATED COURSE


This course is designed for students that meet one of the following criterion: are currently licensed RN with at least 1 year lactation experience; are a La Leche League leader with at least 2 years of experience; are a certified Childbirth Educator with CAPPA, ICEA, or Lamaze who has taught a minimum of 12 breastfeeding classes; or are a WIC peer counselor or registered dietician with at least 2 years breastfeeding support experience. CAPPA members may apply for the Accelerated Course by sending proof of qualifications to info@cappa.net.



  • Membership fee: $65.00

  • CAPPA Academy: $175.00

  • Training class: $400.00 and up

  • Total cost: $640.00 and up, plus cost of books


Course Requirements



  • 2 years to complete your course from the date of your CAPPA in-person training class.

  • CAPPA certification candidates must be at least 18 years of age. No person under 18 years of age may attend CAPPA training classes.

  • Be a member of CAPPA.

  • Enroll in the Lactation Educator Accelerated Course in CAPPA Academy.

  • Attend a 20-hour CAPPA Lactation Educator training class.

  • Read the CAPPA Lactation Educator training manual and the required books from the CAPPA required reading list.

  • Submit a 15 minute video of yourself teaching or student teach with an approved mentor for a 15 minute class. Details/forms are provided within CAPPA Academy.

  • Create a local breastfeeding resource guide.

  • In order for candidates to be eligible for CAPPA certification they must sign and agree to the following forms: Code of Conduct and Social Media Policy, Grievance Policy, Mission Statement, CAPPA Approach /Philosophy Statement, Vision Statement, and Scope of Practice.

  • Pass the multiple choice exam and essays in CAPPA Academy. An 85% passing grade is required.

  • Please view all of CAPPA’s Policies and Procedures.


LE(C) COMMUNITY LACTATION EDUCATOR


The purpose of the CAPPA community lactation educator program is to provide childbirth professionals comprehensive training in breastfeeding education. When a candidate completes the certification program they will be qualified to teach, support, and educate the public on breastfeeding and related issues. When all requirements have been satisfactorily completed, candidates will be issued the CAPPA credential, Certified Community Lactation Educator, LE(C).


This program is distinct and separate from the CLE® program. While both the LE(C) and the CLE® provide families with support and education, the LE(C) is not qualified to lead group classes or facilitate a breastfeeding class. They are trained breastfeeding professionals that offer one on one breastfeeding support and education. The LE(C) also does not offer medical advice or provide lactation consulting or breastfeeding assessment. The LE(C) does receive extensive training in proper referral for families needing breastfeeding intervention.


TRADITIONAL COURSE


This course is designed for students who choose to take the in-person training class.



  • Membership fee: $65.00

  • CAPPA Academy: $175.00

  • Training class fee: $400.00 and up

  • Total cost: $640.00 and up, plus cost of books


Course Requirements



  • 2 years to complete your course from the date of your CAPPA in-person training class.

  • CAPPA certification candidates must be at least 18 years of age. No person under 18 years of age may attend CAPPA training classes.

  • Be a member of CAPPA.

  • Enroll in the Community Lactation Educator Traditional Course in CAPPA Academy.

  • Attend a 2 Day CAPPA Community Lactation Educator training class or a 20 Hour CAPPA Lactation Educator training class.

  • Read the CAPPA Community Lactation Educator training manual and the required books from the CAPPA required reading list.

  • Document attendance of two La Leche League, Nursing Mother’s Council or local breastfeeding support meetings.

  • Create a resource list with information on local support for parents. A guide for creating this list is included within CAPPA Academy.

  • Write a one-page personal essay on why you want to be a Certified Community Lactation Educator.

  • Submit two letters of recommendation.

  • In order for candidates to be eligible for CAPPA certification they must sign and agree to the following forms: Code of Conduct and Social Media Policy, Grievance Policy, Mission Statement, CAPPA Approach / Philosophy Statement, Vision Statement, and Scope of Practice.

  • Pass the multiple choice exam and essays in CAPPA Academy. An 85% passing grade is required.

  • Please view all of CAPPA’s Policies and Procedures.


HOSPITAL/WIC ADMINISTRATORS CLICK HERE


Is your hospital, WIC department, or governmental agency in need of CAPPA Certified Lactation Educators™? CAPPA faculty can come to your location and train your staff or community members to become CAPPA Certified Lactation Educators™.


The 20-hour CLE® training program is designed to train and certify professionals to work with families from preconception through the stage of weaning offering education, encouragement, counseling, an experienced point of view, and fostering confidence, and a commitment to breastfeeding. Lactation Educators can be found working in a variety of settings to offer their services to families. Families can find them working as public health educators, WIC peer counselors, hospital/community educators, pediatric support professionals, and in private practice as educators.


CAPPA is an international certification organization for Doulas, Childbirth Educators and Lactation Educators. Since our foundation in 1998, we have certified thousands of perinatal professionals. As one of the first and most comprehensive perinatal organizations in the world, CAPPA is respected for its longevity and its commitment to excellence in both education and unsurpassed student and member support. Choosing an organization for your education is an important decision. CAPPA offers stability that you can be confident in as you invest in your education and career.


For more information, email info@cappa.net or call 770-965-9777.



The Executive Director for the Lactation Educator Program is Kimberly Bepler (cledirector@cappa.net).

PHONE: 770-965-9777
EMAIL: INFO@CAPPA.NET

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